Business Goals: PERQ was looking to take their existing microsite experience for direct mail marketing campaigns and update it with an improved experience for customers and branding from PERQ’s digital incentive platform, FATWIN. All customers would be converted to the new FATWIN microsite from the previous brand’s microsite.

User Requirements: User research, revised user personas, and a renewed product strategy had revealed a need to improve the information architecture, interaction design, and content strategy in order to build more trust in the FATWIN brand and an improved direct mail-to-microsite experience.

User Flow

User Flow

User Flows

User Flows

Wireframes

Wireframes

Wireframes

Wireframes

 

User Flows: I created user workflow diagrams to help visualize the logical flow of information to help clarify the user and business requirements, as well as to identify the various use cases to be considered within the revised microsite.

Wireframes: With my fellow UX/UI team member, we created many low- to mid-fidelity wireframes not only to document early ideas, but also to define and conceptualize the interaction design. As the requirements changed throughout iterations of the wireframes, the numerous concepts allowed us to clarify how the requirements could translate into a user interface.

Annotated Clickable Prototypes and UI Patterns: We created three iterations of clickable prototypes along with revised UI patterns, ending with an interactive prototype that I created using Axure to demonstrate how the user would interact with the microsite on the web (desktop and mobile), coming from the motivational trigger on a direct mail piece they received. By viewing these prototypes on the web (and in the hands of users), we were able to get an idea of the overall user experience prior to development. These prototypes were also used for usability testing.

 

Usability Testing: Three areas within the prototype were identified where user feedback could aid product development. The test plan consisted of a combination of user interview questions and a set of both structured and unstructured tasks based on a defined scenario of using the microsite. I conducted quick, informal tests with coworkers to help me identify initial usability flaws and fixed any glaring issues in the prototype between each test. Then, I facilitated more in-depth online usability testing with targeted users using an interactive prototype created with Axure and recorded the tests with Silverback. Following each test, I analyzed the results to help inform any changes to the microsite.

Results: As part of a product development team, I helped with the UX and UI design of the Direct Mail Promotion Microsite that allowed users to have an improved experience and recognize the new branding implemented throughout the site. While using a highly iterative design and usability evaluation process, we experimented with a variety of interaction design approaches. By remaining involved throughout the entire product development process, I was able to help ensure that the desired user experience was achieved.

Road Trip Ready graphic design created by Blake McCreary.